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2 hours ago, 五十嵐 美幸 said:

 

This made me laugh so hard even if it's unfair and I know what he wants to express with the Japanese - something like "You're (all) great" I am sure - but the "anata" is such a total "gaijin" mistake really someone should please get Yuzu or his mother to teach a few basic things. 😅

 

"anata" - to explain my hilarity - while in dictionaries is given as "you," in Japanese, it's a term with which one addresses a lover or partner. And exclusively that. Not even the closest friends. So of course it applies only to humans.

 

The way he used it - unintentionally and unknowingly I'm sure and the nicest intent, a thing I like - he just personified Japan and told them pretty much the last thing before one would propose. 

 

I think it's really sweet that he made that post, but at the same time it's really pretty hilarious to my atm ever tired but still overactive brain. 

 

I needed a laugh, too. Thank you!

 

It reminded me of this - have you seen it? A note of thank you and welcome to Japan written by Yuzu to Tatiana Tarasova 

crutFeYhy4w.jpg

 

In it, Yuzu addresses TAT as if she were his close friend of the same age - using a familiar form of the verb. And calls her a mum (incidentally, messing up the case form as well). But all in all, he clearly did it on his own. :xD:

I just remember how much hilarity this pic caused... 

 

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4 minutes ago, Fay said:

 

It reminded me of this - have you seen it? A note of thank you and welcome to Japan written by Yuzu to Tatiana Tarasova 

crutFeYhy4w.jpg

 

In it, Yuzu addresses TAT as if she were his close friend of the same age - using a familiar form of the verb. And calls her a mum (incidentally, messing up the case form as well). But all in all, he clearly did it on his own. :xD:

I just remember how much hilarity this pic caused... 

 

 

:rofl: this is so cute

Also I'm wondering, which version of the spelling of Yuzuru has he used?

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Just now, liha said:

 

:rofl: this is so cute

Also I'm wondering, which version of the spelling of Yuzuru has he used?

 

I can see the 'd' in Yuzuru, so it's 'Yudzuru'?

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Just now, sallycinnamon said:

 

I can see the 'd' in Yuzuru, so it's 'Yudzuru'?

 

That's the version his fans prefer, right?

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Just now, liha said:

 

That's the version his fans prefer, right?

 

I think yes, but I'm not sure :embSwan:

on his wiki it's the same: Юдзуру Ханю, 'Yudzuru Hanyu'

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2 minutes ago, liha said:

 

That's the version his fans prefer, right?

His fans prefer Yuzuru, Yudzuru is like his official name. :) 

Which he dutifully spelt here. He's got a very nice handwriting!

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Just now, Fay said:

His fans prefer Yuzuru, Yudzuru is like his official name. :) 

Which he dutifully spelt here. He's got a very nice handwriting!

 

Thank you for clarifying again :)

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Just now, Fay said:

His fans prefer Yuzuru, Yudzuru is like his official name. :) 

Which he dutifully spelt here. He's got a very nice handwriting!

 

Oh I see! So he probably just copied it from wiki. I hoped he had done some more research on what his fans call him

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omg the first time I saw his note for TAT, I showed it to my coaches and they were like "...no way, what should we do with this boy " :rofl:we were just laughing so hard, just imagine if anyone else wrote it like that  ...:smiley-scared007:

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6 hours ago, Fay said:

 

It reminded me of this - have you seen it? A note of thank you and welcome to Japan written by Yuzu to Tatiana Tarasova 

crutFeYhy4w.jpg

 

In it, Yuzu addresses TAT as if she were his close friend of the same age - using a familiar form of the verb. And calls her a mum (incidentally, messing up the case form as well). But all in all, he clearly did it on his own. :xD:

I just remember how much hilarity this pic caused... 

 

 

5 hours ago, SydneyH said:

omg the first time I saw his note for TAT, I showed it to my coaches and they were like "...no way, what should we do with this boy " :rofl:we were just laughing so hard, just imagine if anyone else wrote it like that  ...:smiley-scared007:

 

I'm afraid my knowledge of Russian is somewhere just marginally above zero, but as I am a curious critter, could someone please explain why it was funny? ^^;

 

Or I guess it's the "close friend" form is inappropriate?

 

Actually calling her Mom the same time is quite funny, too.

 

And this thread made me look up Katarina Witt; it was a bit of an "eh?" to see she was in Calgary. LOL

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1 hour ago, 五十嵐 美幸 said:

 

 

I'm afraid my knowledge of Russian is somewhere just marginally above zero, but as I am a curious critter, could someone please explain why it was funny? ^^;

 

Or I guess it's the "close friend" form is inappropriate?

 

Actually calling her Mom the same time is quite funny, too.

 

And this thread made me look up Katarina Witt; it was a bit of an "eh?" to see she was in Calgary. LOL

Well, the last sentence  - "Приезжай в Японию" - is Yuzu's invitation and it says 'Come to Japan". A singular imperative form of the verb приезжать. But the matter is that you can use this form only with your close friends, your family, people of your age - in short, it's a familiar form, not a respectful one. The respectful one, the one you use with older people, with people in authority, with strangers is plural imperative "приезжайте". What makes Yuzu's note even more hilarious and sweet is that he used TAT's name and patronymic - Татьяна Анатольевна - which incidentally clashes with the familiar imperatve form. I'm not saying it's impossible to use singular with patronymic, but to my ears it'll forever sound ironic and even more familiar than just Татьяна.

The thing is you can be friends, even close friends with people and never start with 'приезжай'. I've got some friends I regularly visit in England and stay around with them for two or three weeks. For decades now. But I'm still on приезжайте terms with them - and it doesn't make any of us feel distant, or cold or reserved. Приезжай in certain circles has to be settled in childhood or youth, not later - and it takes a conscious effort to start addressing the same people with 'приезжай'. 

"Благодарю маме" is another sweet mistake. No doubt TAT was touched and flattered to be included among the horde of parents Yuzu has, but she's sure to chuckle at it too. 

If Yuzu had used Спасибо, then "маме" would have been correct, but Благодарю demands a different case - accusative, not dative - and it should have been Благодарю маму. The essential meaning is the same - "Thanks Mum". But in this case Yuzu went for a bigger and grander word than just Спасибо. 

Sweet and hilarious - I think I both melted into a pool and I giggled for hours at it. 

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1 hour ago, Fay said:

Well, the last sentence  - "Приезжай в Японию" - is Yuzu's invitation and it says 'Come to Japan". A singular imperative form of the verb приезжать. But the matter is that you can use this form only with your close friends, your family, people of your age - in short, it's a familiar form, not a respectful one. The respectful one, the one you use with older people, with people in authority, with strangers is plural imperative "приезжайте". What makes Yuzu's note even more hilarious and sweet is that he used TAT's name and patronymic - Татьяна Анатольевна - which incidentally clashes with the familiar imperatve form. I'm not saying it's impossible to use singular with patronymic, but to my ears it'll forever sound ironic and even more familiar than just Татьяна.

The thing is you can be friends, even close friends with people and never start with 'приезжай'. I've got some friends I regularly visit in England and stay around with them for two or three weeks. For decades now. But I'm still on приезжайте terms with them - and it doesn't make any of us feel distant, or cold or reserved. Приезжай in certain circles has to be settled in childhood or youth, not later - and it takes a conscious effort to start addressing the same people with 'приезжай'. 

"Благодарю маме" is another sweet mistake. No doubt TAT was touched and flattered to be included among the horde of parents Yuzu has, but she's sure to chuckle at it too. 

If Yuzu had used Спасибо, then "маме" would have been correct, but Благодарю demands a different case - accusative, not dative - and it should have been Благодарю маму. The essential meaning is the same - "Thanks Mum". But in this case Yuzu went for a bigger and grander word than just Спасибо. 

Sweet and hilarious - I think I both melted into a pool and I giggled for hours at it. 

 

Thank you for sharing this! :)

 

Russian sounds like a language I might try to learn if I'd ever get enough time, it seems quite a challenge! I had European classical language studies long ago and someone said knowing ancient Greek would be useful for learning Russian, though I don't know if that is true and it was long ago anyhow. ^^;

 

As for Yuzu and Russian, that sounds like his dorky sweet best. :7938863: :rofl: :7938863:

 

And I'm willing to bet it never occurred to him that he knows enough Russians to ask one how to do it correctly! LOL

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9 minutes ago, 五十嵐 美幸 said:

 

Thank you for sharing this! :)

 

Russian sounds like a language I might try to learn if I'd ever get enough time, it seems quite a challenge! I had European classical language studies long ago and someone said knowing ancient Greek would be useful for learning Russian, though I don't know if that is true and it was long ago anyhow. ^^;

 

As for Yuzu and Russian, that sounds like his dorky sweet best. :7938863: :rofl: :7938863:

 

And I'm willing to bet it never occurred to him that he knows enough Russians to ask one how to do it correctly! LOL

I bet as a matter of principle he set out on that mission alone. No Russian'speaking people would have made those mistakes. But it makes his efforts all the more precious!

 

And yes, knowing classical Greek or Latin does help to learn Russian quite a lot. It's got just as complex system of endings and a multitude of forms for nouns, pronouns, adjectives and numerals. Verbs are rather poorly equipped with forms, but then we've got perfective/non-perfective forms which prove to be a stumpbling block for many students of Russian. 

The verbs of movement - simple 'go' and 'come' - are also a curse for learners of Russian, they say... 

I was lucky to learn it at the age of 7, really, when no conscious efforts had to be made. 

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I know what you mean... I dabbled a bit in Latin based languages - Spanish, Italian, French - in my first long stay in Europe and it was easy then, when I was much younger, but then I didn't have chances to use them for years and forgot everything and now I just don't remember as quickly as I use to.

 

For Spanish at least I have an incentive now, but the others would be very uphill work.

 

PS edit: Now I have this image of Yuzu in my head, with his ipad or macbook, - with his black frame glasses; I love those - trying to find his way through Russian, tongue stuck out a bit with concentration and occasionally cursing when things don't go as he wants. ^^;

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