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11 часов назад, Paskud сказал:

More than, for example, F1.

I beg to differ. F1 drivers must be very fit and have great reflexes. *It's a former fan speaking in me*

So yeah, let's not go there... I had a laugh over the winner, but at least we got a video message :war:

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6 hours ago, KatjaThera said:

I guess that to me is what makes the difference: the physical effort required to practice the sport. So, F1 is a sport, FS is a sport, gold maybe less so, snooker, no comment. To give just a few examples. (And I mention snooker because it's often broadcasted on EuroSport)

 

:offtopic2:A little personal experience:

Spoiler

 

I've been a Snooker player for five years now. Not pro level yet, but competing in minor events (as a girl I'm an exotic species in this sport :laughing:).

It's true that Snooker doesn't require that much physical strength, but there are multiple other aspects that are very challenging in the long term:

 

1. Many players suffer serious back problems, if they don't take care of their body posture. An average match lasts 3-4 hours with a 15min break inbetween (the WC final is even two days long, 10~15 hours) and that can cause a lot of damage, if you're not well trained.

2. The tournament schedule is really tough, especially at the international Main Tour (similar to Tennis). A competition lasts a week or two with only one day break before the next one and it's a permanent travel from Europe to China and back to Europe. If you're not used to jetlag and playing late at night, it's not your sport.

3. Most beginners need a day to hit a single ball and lose their motivation, before they have potted anything. (Normal Pool Billiard is a joke compared to this.)

In your first year as a newbie you don't do anything else but try to hit the cue ball in a straight line up and down the table. 4-8 hours a day. If you've survived that torture, you're the titan of self-discipline and nothing can bore you anymore :laughing:

4. Snooker is a mix of chess and archery. Good cueing requires excellent precision and coordination of your eyes, head, arms and fingers. It's not enough to pot a ball, you have to look five or six steps ahead in your break building and bring your opponent into trouble. While chess is a pure cognitive sport, in Snooker you have to execute your ideas first. In 50% of the cases the balls don't follow your brain...

 

I think it's quite the same with Golf. Looks easy peasy, but if you want to be on top, it's not enough to find a course and buy your equipment. There's a lot of hard work behind it.

I'm just a bit disappointed that Woods has already been the sportsman of the year twice while others like McMorris haven't won any Laureus yet and their Comeback story was truly inspirational.

 

 

 

Olympic Channel stays a true Fanyu :notamused:

https://www.olympicchannel.com/en/stories/news/detail/laureus-comeback-award-hanyu-vonn/

 

Yuzu in the header, Yuzu in the headlines plus extra paragraph for him. I guess they're more disappointed than we are :laughing:

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1 hour ago, Henni147 said:

 

:offtopic2:A little personal experience:

  Hide contents

 

I've been a Snooker player for five years now. Not pro level yet, but competing in minor events (as a girl I'm an exotic species in this sport :laughing:).

It's true that Snooker doesn't require that much physical strength, but there are multiple other aspects that are very challenging in the long term:

 

1. Many players suffer serious back problems, if they don't take care of their body posture. An average match lasts 3-4 hours with a 15min break inbetween (the WC final is even two days long, 10~15 hours) and that can cause a lot of damage, if you're not well trained.

2. The tournament schedule is really tough, especially at the international Main Tour (similar to Tennis). A competition lasts a week or two with only one day break before the next one and it's a permanent travel from Europe to China and back to Europe. If you're not used to jetlag and playing late at night, it's not your sport.

3. Most beginners need a day to hit a single ball and lose their motivation, before they have potted anything. (Normal Pool Billiard is a joke compared to this.)

In your first year as a newbie you don't do anything else but try to hit the cue ball in a straight line up and down the table. 4-8 hours a day. If you've survived that torture, you're the titan of self-discipline and nothing can bore you anymore :laughing:

4. Snooker is a mix of chess and archery. Good cueing requires excellent precision and coordination of your eyes, head, arms and fingers. It's not enough to pot a ball, you have to look five or six steps ahead in your break building and bring your opponent into trouble. While chess is a pure cognitive sport, in Snooker you have to execute your ideas first. In 50% of the cases the balls don't follow your brain...

 

I think it's quite the same with Golf. Looks easy peasy, but if you want to be on top, it's not enough to find a course and buy your equipment. There's a lot of hard work behind it.

I'm just a bit disappointed that Woods has already been the sportsman of the year twice while others like McMorris haven't won any Laureus yet and their Comeback story was truly inspirational.

 

 

 

Olympic Channel stays a true Fanyu :notamused:

https://www.olympicchannel.com/en/stories/news/detail/laureus-comeback-award-hanyu-vonn/

 

Yuzu in the header, Yuzu in the headlines plus extra paragraph for him. I guess they're more disappointed than we are :laughing:

Thank you for the OT, loved the info:tumblr_inline_n18qraikFP1qid2nw:

 

For laybackInaBauer lovers, some IB for every taste here:68271262:

 https://twitter.com/yuuhi_hy/status/1097795072093958145

I love how Yuzuru uses his arms in different ways in every program. Even when he does the same move, like holding his arms up and then opening them, he can make it look gentle and dream-like as in NS, or fierce and explosion-like as in Origin.

OWG Seimei was also extra-special and extra-powerful among all the Seimei IB thanks to that added little flourish:tumblr_inline_n0o1fhfhFY1qid2nw::tumblr_inline_n0o1fhfhFY1qid2nw:

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13 minutes ago, LadyLou said:

Thank you for the OT, loved the info:tumblr_inline_n18qraikFP1qid2nw:

 

For laybackInaBauer lovers, some IB for every taste here:68271262:

 https://twitter.com/yuuhi_hy/status/1097795072093958145

I love how Yuzuru uses his arms in different ways in every program. Even when he does the same move, like holding his arms up and then opening them, he can make it look gentle and dream-like as in NS, or fierce and explosion-like as in Origin.

OWG Seimei was also extra-special and extra-powerful among all the Seimei IB thanks to that added little flourish:tumblr_inline_n0o1fhfhFY1qid2nw::tumblr_inline_n0o1fhfhFY1qid2nw:

How exquisite is the Swan IB.  Just :tumblr_inline_nhkezsTB3v1qid2nw:

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1 hour ago, Henni147 said:

 

:offtopic2:A little personal experience:

  Reveal hidden contents

 

I've been a Snooker player for five years now. Not pro level yet, but competing in minor events (as a girl I'm an exotic species in this sport :laughing:).

It's true that Snooker doesn't require that much physical strength, but there are multiple other aspects that are very challenging in the long term:

 

1. Many players suffer serious back problems, if they don't take care of their body posture. An average match lasts 3-4 hours with a 15min break inbetween (the WC final is even two days long, 10~15 hours) and that can cause a lot of damage, if you're not well trained.

2. The tournament schedule is really tough, especially at the international Main Tour (similar to Tennis). A competition lasts a week or two with only one day break before the next one and it's a permanent travel from Europe to China and back to Europe. If you're not used to jetlag and playing late at night, it's not your sport.

3. Most beginners need a day to hit a single ball and lose their motivation, before they have potted anything. (Normal Pool Billiard is a joke compared to this.)

In your first year as a newbie you don't do anything else but try to hit the cue ball in a straight line up and down the table. 4-8 hours a day. If you've survived that torture, you're the titan of self-discipline and nothing can bore you anymore :laughing:

4. Snooker is a mix of chess and archery. Good cueing requires excellent precision and coordination of your eyes, head, arms and fingers. It's not enough to pot a ball, you have to look five or six steps ahead in your break building and bring your opponent into trouble. While chess is a pure cognitive sport, in Snooker you have to execute your ideas first. In 50% of the cases the balls don't follow your brain...

 

I think it's quite the same with Golf. Looks easy peasy, but if you want to be on top, it's not enough to find a course and buy your equipment. There's a lot of hard work behind it.

I'm just a bit disappointed that Woods has already been the sportsman of the year twice while others like McMorris haven't won any Laureus yet and their Comeback story was truly inspirational.

 

 

 

Olympic Channel stays a true Fanyu :notamused:

https://www.olympicchannel.com/en/stories/news/detail/laureus-comeback-award-hanyu-vonn/

 

Yuzu in the header, Yuzu in the headlines plus extra paragraph for him. I guess they're more disappointed than we are :laughing:

 

:offtopic2:

Spoiler

Thank you for the experience share! I actually have no doubt that each sport has something that those who practice it must excel at. I could never hope to be a successful snooker or golf player, because I'm really bad at aiming and such.

 

Back issues for snooker make sense. For golf, too, actually, as there seems to be a lot of standing around.

 

My point was more that there are sports who require more immediate physical effort than others. So, from that point of view alone, I classified them. But at the end of the day, it depends on how each person defines sports and certainly each of them have their charm, or else they wouldn't be popular, right? lol

 

4 hours ago, Lunna said:

I beg to differ. F1 drivers must be very fit and have great reflexes. *It's a former fan speaking in me*

So yeah, let's not go there... I had a laugh over the winner, but at least we got a video message :war:

Yay, fellow F1 fan (even if former lol I'm not nearly as into it now as I was many years ago, either)

 

Now I randomly wonder if Yuzu has any interest in cars... though I guess if he did, he might have been tempted to at least try to get his drivers license, so maybe now...

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17 hours ago, Paskud said:

More than, for example, F1.

meanwhile *nervous laugh* 30 days until worlds

Hahahah, nervous laugh too

:muahaha:

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55 minutes ago, ruruzest said:

A suit that accentuates the Waist!!!

..... *Silently saves*

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1 hour ago, ruruzest said:

A suit that accentuates the Waist!!!

We were saved. Imagine if we had seen the real version...

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I didn't see this here, so sorry if this is a repost, but look, the Laureus folks gave us fans a nice acknowledgement!

 

 

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Talking about legacy ... we know there a lot of skaters influenced by him, but there is also a Japanese rhythmic gymnast (2017 WC bronze with hoop) who's using H&L music :68556365: (I confess my brain didn't understand first, I had a moment of wavering ...''what's happening !" !!)

It was her first performance, so it's not perfect and flawless (the music cut may also distract some of you), but still great to see a Japanese athlete of another sport using his music ! :10636614:

 

 

Also yes this app seems real fun (although excel sheet is always more discreet at work ....)

 

Guyss this app is so interesting and fun! 

We can be our own judge using this app while streaming live competitions to compare how the scores could have been 

 

 

 

 

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