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Hello!

 

As we all know Planet Hanyu is a really big community with thousands of Fanyus from all over the world. I find it amazing how Yuzuru managed to bring so many people with so many diffrent backgrounds together with his talend and the magic of his skating.

I thought that it would be a good idea to create a topic where Fanyus can write about their culture and share its' magic with other people.

 

Write about your country's traditions, local food, special holiday celebrations, beautiful places, traditional stories and fairytales- anything!

 

Even if we live in a time period where we have to stay inside to protect ourselves and other people from a deadly virus, we can travel all around the world through everyone's stories.

 

Looking forward to reading your replies and travelling with you guys!

 

:snpeace:

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On 3/17/2021 at 6:46 PM, hananistellata said:

Hello!

 

As we all know Planet Hanyu is a really big community with thousands of Fanyus from all over the world. I find it amazing how Yuzuru managed to bring so many people with so many diffrent backgrounds together with his talend and the magic of his skating.

I thought that it would be a good idea to create a topic where Fanyus can write about their culture and share its' magic with other people.

 

Write about your country's traditions, local food, special holiday celebrations, beautiful places, traditional stories and fairytales- anything!

 

Even if we live in a time period where we have to stay inside to protect ourselves and other people from a deadly virus, we can travel all around the world through everyone's stories.

 

Looking forward to reading your replies and travelling with you guys!

 

:snpeace:

 

What about starting with your own country? Maybe some any random things you'd like to share with us? Greece has a very rich culture and fascinating history.

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11 hours ago, sallycinnamon said:

 

What about starting with your own country? Maybe some any random things you'd like to share with us? Greece has a very rich culture and fascinating history.

Of course!

 

Greece has plenty of traditions and holidays, probably many more than I can count. :'D Traditions may vary depending on regions and prefectures but I think I'll start with a more popular one and leave regional ones for later. 

 

I'll talk about a tradition we call καρναβάλι!

 

Before Easter we go on a fasting period of 40 days. But exactly one day before the fasting period starts we celebrate our last day of being able to eat whatever we want by wearing funny costumes (dressing up as clowns, grandmas, witches, ugly creatures etc), drinking and eating all we can and dancing to loud traditional music. There are also various καρναβάλι parades that are held every year (well, except from last year and this year thankfully) all around Greece with the most popular one being in Πάτρα. 

 

Celebrating in such way has been a part of our religious life ever since ancient times where we would do the same activities to worship Dionysus.

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I think Carnival is quite rooted in many European (and some non-European) countries! I've read the name came from a dialectal Italian meaning, sort of "farewell to meat" — but I thought that, with Orthodox Churches being so strict about even the period before Lent, there was no Carnival in Orthodox countries. I have read there was in Russia a pancake day, much ahead of Lent, after which they ceased to eat even eggs and dairies? Sorry if this sound religious, it is that religion does have influence on culture!

In France Carnival culture originates in medieval student subculture, and it is not that marked nowadays. Just, between the end of the Winter and the beginning of Spring, schools tend to name a day for children to come costumed. In England I saw the same. Of course they love it.

I have never been in Greece, but we often have Greek olive oil (usually, either a "basic" one from Creta, or Kalamata oil from kalamon/kalamata olives from Messenia or Laconia, which my husband calls "his preferred fruit juice", though our gastronomical culture (from childhood) is more with Spanish ones.

Do you have a particular olive oil culture in Greece, I mean, eating each dish with a different olive oil as they do in Italy for instance?

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On 3/22/2021 at 2:56 PM, SitTwizzle said:

I think Carnival is quite rooted in many European (and some non-European) countries! I've read the name came from a dialectal Italian meaning, sort of "farewell to meat" — but I thought that, with Orthodox Churches being so strict about even the period before Lent, there was no Carnival in Orthodox countries. I have read there was in Russia a pancake day, much ahead of Lent, after which they ceased to eat even eggs and dairies? Sorry if this sound religious, it is that religion does have influence on culture!

In France Carnival culture originates in medieval student subculture, and it is not that marked nowadays. Just, between the end of the Winter and the beginning of Spring, schools tend to name a day for children to come costumed. In England I saw the same. Of course they love it.

I have never been in Greece, but we often have Greek olive oil (usually, either a "basic" one from Creta, or Kalamata oil from kalamon/kalamata olives from Messenia or Laconia, which my husband calls "his preferred fruit juice", though our gastronomical culture (from childhood) is more with Spanish ones.

Do you have a particular olive oil culture in Greece, I mean, eating each dish with a different olive oil as they do in Italy for instance?

Yup! The original roots from the kind of καρναβάλι that we have been celebrating these recent decades are from other European countires, mostly Italy I think.

Another name that we have for καρναβάλι is Απόκριες which means 'abstention from meat'.

 

As for the olive oil, my family uses the olive oil from the olives that we collect from our family olive trees in a nearby village and I've been used to using that oil my whole life. I've tasted olive oil from restaurants and taverns that I've visited but none of them really stood out to me or tasted any different so I can't really say for sure.

 

 

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This is so very interesting! I am from the US and really haven't heard about any of this. 

 

In my area, which is the South, most people go to church on Easter Sunday (we can't though because of pandemic) and have a meal afterwards. A lot of people eat Ham for Easter.  When I was a child, my parents would buy me and my siblings Easter baskets and fill them with candy and stuffed animals. We also would have an Easter egg hunt in the backyard. Oh and we would dye eggs fun colors too. 

(Some Christians do not do Easter baskets or eggs as they feel it takes away from the meaning but we've always seen it as harmless fun)

 

I don't know if this is interesting to anybody as it sounds so normal to me :)

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4 minutes ago, Glory said:

This is so very interesting! I am from the US and really haven't heard about any of this. 

 

In my area, which is the South, most people go to church on Easter Sunday (we can't though because of pandemic) and have a meal afterwards. A lot of people eat Ham for Easter.  When I was a child, my parents would buy me and my siblings Easter baskets and fill them with candy and stuffed animals. We also would have an Easter egg hunt in the backyard. Oh and we would dye eggs fun colors too. 

(Some Christians do not do Easter baskets or eggs as they feel it takes away from the meaning but we've always seen it as harmless fun)

 

I don't know if this is interesting to anybody as it sounds so normal to me :)

Thank you!

I had never heard of Easter ham. Quite interesting. In France it is more often lamb, but I don't know if it has been a longstanding tradition everywhere or if it is a XIXth Century uniformisation.

And then there's also the eggs hunt for children, hidden in the garden for those who have, in the home for those who haven't, and I saw English and German people do the same. In Germany they still have real eggs painted or coloured (one can get good results even without wasting food, cooking whole eggs with beetroot skin or juice for pink eggs, with the outside leaves of a red cabbage for blue, etc), and they can be bought already coloured in groceries and supermarkets. One can also pierce both ends of an egg and empty it (and use the white and yolk for an omelette or pancakes etc), and then decorate the empty shell, in this way it can be kept some time. But I confess I'm so clumsy I've never managed to do it right.

And in Germany and other German-culture-influenced regions, there is a notion of an Easter hare, which makes that until the age of eight, I believed hares and rabbits were oviparous! :rofl3:While in other places, as Church rituals make that bells don't ring in the period before Easter, some children are told bells are gone and come back for Easter. Hence all these chocolate things in the shape of rabbits, bells...

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10 minutes ago, SitTwizzle said:

Thank you!

I had never heard of Easter ham. Quite interesting. In France it is more often lamb, but I don't know if it has been a longstanding tradition everywhere or if it is a XIXth Century uniformisation.

And then there's also the eggs hunt for children, hidden in the garden for those who have, in the home for those who haven't, and I saw English and German people do the same. In Germany they still have real eggs painted or coloured (one can get good results even without wasting food, cooking whole eggs with beetroot skin or juice for pink eggs, with the outside leaves of a red cabbage for blue, etc), and they can be bought already coloured in groceries and supermarkets. One can also pierce both ends of an egg and empty it (and use the white and yolk for an omelette or pancakes etc), and then decorate the empty shell, in this way it can be kept some time. But I confess I'm so clumsy I've never managed to do it right.

And in Germany and other German-culture-influenced regions, there is a notion of an Easter hare, which makes that until the age of eight, I believed hares and rabbits were oviparous! :rofl3:While in other places, as Church rituals make that bells don't ring in the period before Easter, some children are told bells are gone and come back for Easter. Hence all these chocolate things in the shape of rabbits, bells...

Here lamb is mainly served at fancy restaurants but I bet you have much better food. We'd always buy plastic eggs for hiding in the yard and boil egg to dye.  Of course here in the US we want the easiest way so we dye using store bought egg dying kit thay includes the dye, a wire egg spoon thing that helps put the egg in the cup, a white crayon to write on the egg before you dye it if you want and a cardboard egg stand.  I bet the eggs in Germany are much prettier. 

 

We also have chocolate rabbits and some children believe the Easter bunny comes every Easter to bring eggs or gifts.  Never heard of chocolate bells though. So cool to learn about these things!

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Talking about eggs we also have a tradition where we paint boiled eggs red (I'm pretty sure red symbolizes the blood of Christ) and on Easter day family members try to smash eachother's eggs. The red egg that remains in perfect condition (or at least the one which took less damage) wins. :laughing:

 

Most of the time we eat the eggs too but sometimes the paint dyes the inside part of the egg too, which is fine now because egg dyes are made to be harmless, but ever since I was young it disgusted me a little so I give mine to my dad. 

 

We have so many more egg related traditions that I might write about in the future. 

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1 hour ago, Glory said:

Here lamb is mainly served at fancy restaurants but I bet you have much better food. We'd always buy plastic eggs for hiding in the yard and boil egg to dye.  Of course here in the US we want the easiest way so we dye using store bought egg dying kit thay includes the dye, a wire egg spoon thing that helps put the egg in the cup, a white crayon to write on the egg before you dye it if you want and a cardboard egg stand.  I bet the eggs in Germany are much prettier. 

 

We also have chocolate rabbits and some children believe the Easter bunny comes every Easter to bring eggs or gifts.  Never heard of chocolate bells though. So cool to learn about these things!

Oh, but here eggs for the eggs hunt are made of chocolate too, or other sweets such as nougat! and often covered with decorated tin foil. Glouton children regularly get sick, more prudent ones keep some for later.

In Germany too there are egg decoration kits. I really don't know where Easter eggs are prettier. Maybe in Russia? (I'm not speaking of the Fabergé eggs of course.)

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Anybody have any summer traditions or holidays? We only have Mother's Day in May, Father's Day in June and our Independence Day on July 4th. 

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31 minutes ago, Glory said:

Anybody have any summer traditions or holidays? We only have Mother's Day in May, Father's Day in June and our Independence Day on July 4th. 

Well, we have Int. worker's day on May 1st (like many countries) which here is a major holiday off from work/school and it's sort of traditional to go to a picnic/in the countryside or on a similar outing to nature, and there's also a major religious holiday, St. George's day (Đurđevdan) which separated symbolically winter and summer. It has many various traditions and superstitions around it, one I know is you're supposed to go herb gathering ahead of time and weave a wreath to hang on the house/in the kitchen. Like these:)

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1 hour ago, Glory said:

Anybody have any summer traditions or holidays? We only have Mother's Day in May, Father's Day in June and our Independence Day on July 4th. 

 

We have St. Stephen's Day on 20 August when we celebrate the foundation of Hungary (it was founded in 1000). We usually have big fireworks across the whole country, they look pretty!!

 

budapest-tuzijatek-410896.jpg

 

We consider it the end of summer, after 20 August it usually becomes rainy, colder etc.

 

I consider Mother's day in early May a spring holiday.

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In France, Mothers' day is usually late May or early June. Mostly a commercial day for florists and home appliance sellers (I am fortunate enough never to have had any home appliance as a present, but these are the ads). And school children are (were?) made to make macaroni collars (the infamous tradition, in fact usually other artifacts). And Fathers' day two weeks later, without flowers (I don't see why).

In my view Roland-Garros tennis tournament is less followed as it used to be?

The first half of July tends to be more rainy than the rest of the summer.

Here the "fête nationale" is on July 14th, celebrating a rather sad event of French Revolution but nevertheless personally I often indulge in watching this :

 

 

August 15th, the Assumption of the Virgin Mary, is less of a holiday as it used to be, and August 25th, saint Louis, is no more.

For Parisians, during all the summer several "voies sur berges" (embankment roads) of the Seine are closed to cars and covered with sand to fake beaches.

And I was forgetting the cycling Tour de France in July!

And we are more and more rivalling Italy for delicious ice creams but one have to chose the right ones.

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I only realize how potent the sentiment "Food is a gateway to the culture" can be (as cheesy heh! as it sounds) after I went abroad.

 

I am not necessarily a big foodie (not the type to meticulously document+share my food related adventures online ...alright, maybe document, but not share ), but I do appreciate good food (and the stories behind it). One of my favorite types of YT videos is food reviews (especially those who travels (abroad but 'tis a strange time so... ) for the food), and it is always interesting to see how people eat the things they love and how they cook it.

 

With Ramadan coming I especially feel the lack of food I usually have (during early meal (suhoor) and around fast-breaking time (iftar)) back home in Indonesia. I have been able to adapt to observing Ramadan (and do the fast) in a four-season country, but the food is something I have yet to deal with on my own, that is . Before the pandemic I felt just fine eating the food that I usually eat for fasting here (I eat instant noodle not the healthiest thing I know or oats and cereals/granola/müsli and milk for suhoor meal (yea 'tis a personal tradition I developed myself ) and eat desserts/fruits/anything sweet for iftar (eg. a butter waffle :P or cheese cake or a teeny block of chocolate, you got the idea)) but since last year's Ramadan I only started to feel how lacking it was to not be able to eat the traditional celebration meal during Eid. In 2019 the before times I was able to gather with other fellow Indonesians to have an Eid feast (which consists of opor ayam (chicken cooked in coconut milk and turmeric) and ketupat rice cakes (an absolute must have for my Eid feast!), and then some other side dishes like tempe goreng kering etc. ...and oh! We'll have a lot of cookies too during the Eid feast :D). But last year's Eid? I was stuck at my own place, with nowhere to go for food (obviously, and ofc I understood why this needed to be done) so while I might not feel so sad during Ramadan itself I really felt the loss of not being able to eat the usual Eid feast :( . I compensated by making some ketupat made out of paper (own pictures added soon) -- I might not eat the rice cake itself last year but at least I was able to make the casing :'))

 

Sometimes food is really the most accessible tether you have to connect to your own culture, and I only recently realized it.

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