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Today is PC Chopin's day :heart:. Somehow Yuzu Olympic days are just consecutive it's like Xmas+ Thanksgiving+NY's eve for Fanyus to celebrate :cheer:. Happy 2nd anniversary to this MASTERPIECE. Time to stream:

 

Btw, Yuzu debuted Chopin + SEIMEI pair at 2nd season of last quad (He skated Chopin ealier but only when he paired it with SEIMEI did it start to go into form). And they've come back at 2nd season of this quad too. Is this fate? It's like he's traveled a circle, and finally goes back to where he found himself. I think this pair of programs are his true "origin".

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added a new design based on green Seimei to the ID badge project...check it out if you're so inclined.

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6 hours ago, SitTwizzle said:

Yes, I am so grateful to Brian Orser and Tracy Wilson, who have always respected his personality, his needs. A domineering coach may have harmed him much. And a too complying one may not have brought him to the technical mastery he has now? Even with "a bit less" he would be wonderful (he was wonderful in R&J 1 and even before) yet it would be a loss.

I agree that him going to TCC was probably the best decision of his life. Brian, Tracy and Ghislain and everyone else there are just perfect for Yuzu. Then again, I think they're perfect for a lot of skaters. They did so wonderfully with Javi, helping him reach potential that I'm not sure how many people saw was there, and I think you can see it with Jason and Evgenia as well, skating wise, but also attitude wise. TCC isn't just a training place, it's also a sort of home away from home for skaters, where they are treasured and nurtured and always pushed to become the best version of themselves they can be and encouraged to make their own decisions. I do sometimes wonder how Yuzu would have developed if he'd stayed in Sendai, but I'm not sure Ice Rink Sendai and Nanami-sensei had the resources to take him to the next level.

 

But I also agree that in general, coaches who are too domineering and uncaring of the skaters' personality are bad for the skater, while at the same time coaches who aren't strict enough and who coddle aren't good either. I often find myself thinking that Boyang and Misha and possibly Roman might need slightly stricter coaches. Admittedly, I don't know anything about their actual relationships with their coaches, but in the KnC, there's a slight feeling of them being coddles when things don't go right. I know a lot of people have issues with how Brian reacts when his skaters have bad skates - he received a lot of criticism for his "I don't know what to say" to Evgenia this season - but I prefer that. It's honest, it's matter of fact and afterwards it will probably become: "Ok, that obviously didn't work. Let's think about what we should do next." Which is infinitely better than a "Oh, you poor thing! Just rest for now and you'll see, everything will be alright!" sort of thing. Finding a balance between too strict and too coddling is probably the hard thing to do for coaches and I'm not entirely sure how many coaches have managed to find it. But TCC have for sure, IMO.

 

That said, I don't think Yuzu would work well with either of those extremes. He'd butt heads badly with a domineering coach. Some people joke about Yuzu and Eteri, but I'm 100% sure they'd be at each other's throats in 3 days. Or Yuzu would drive her so crazy she'd kick him out after 3 days. Similarly, with a coddling coach, he wouldn't feel challenged and would probably either go crazy doing whatever he wants, or simply decide he needs something else.

 

As for his personality, I think he has always been very strong and opinionated. Even saying, as a child, that he wants to win two Olympic Gold medals. His personality I think is generally more assertive than your regular Japanese person, although I think he makes up for it in politeness (or perhaps his parents have educated him such, to make sure his politeness counters his assertive personality). But that assertiveness is something many of his haters pick up on, too. I believe there's also quite a contrast between the way Yuzu speaks about wanting to win and what winning - and losing - means to him and the way other skaters speak. I think Yuzu's attitude is perfect and I also think it's essential to achieve this level of success and overcome all the obstacles he's overcome.

 

I also wonder now if this is one reason I'm not fully warmed up to Rika - and other Japanese skaters. Rika seems so meek in interviews, her voice is so soft and her words so polite and even when she loses she's smiling and projects an "oh, well, I'll just have to do better next time" attitude, but then she goes out there and her skating says something else and the gap confuses me lol I will always cheer for the Japanese skaters, but I admit it feels like something is missing when I can't feel that burning passion for victory - or for bettering oneself - that is so obvious in Yuzu everytime his skates touch the ice. Even in ice shows and exhibitions, you can feel his passion for doing the very best that he can, and I don't really get that as much from most of the other Japanese skaters. But that's perhaps because they're more typically Japanese and not so demonstrative with their feelings...

 

(and wow, this turned out rambly... sorry :headdesk:)

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20 minutes ago, KatjaThera said:

I agree that him going to TCC was probably the best decision of his life. Brian, Tracy and Ghislain and everyone else there are just perfect for Yuzu. Then again, I think they're perfect for a lot of skaters. They did so wonderfully with Javi, helping him reach potential that I'm not sure how many people saw was there, and I think you can see it with Jason and Evgenia as well, skating wise, but also attitude wise. TCC isn't just a training place, it's also a sort of home away from home for skaters, where they are treasured and nurtured and always pushed to become the best version of themselves they can be and encouraged to make their own decisions. I do sometimes wonder how Yuzu would have developed if he'd stayed in Sendai, but I'm not sure Ice Rink Sendai and Nanami-sensei had the resources to take him to the next level.

 

But I also agree that in general, coaches who are too domineering and uncaring of the skaters' personality are bad for the skater, while at the same time coaches who aren't strict enough and who coddle aren't good either. I often find myself thinking that Boyang and Misha and possibly Roman might need slightly stricter coaches. Admittedly, I don't know anything about their actual relationships with their coaches, but in the KnC, there's a slight feeling of them being coddles when things don't go right. I know a lot of people have issues with how Brian reacts when his skaters have bad skates - he received a lot of criticism for his "I don't know what to say" to Evgenia this season - but I prefer that. It's honest, it's matter of fact and afterwards it will probably become: "Ok, that obviously didn't work. Let's think about what we should do next." Which is infinitely better than a "Oh, you poor thing! Just rest for now and you'll see, everything will be alright!" sort of thing. Finding a balance between too strict and too coddling is probably the hard thing to do for coaches and I'm not entirely sure how many coaches have managed to find it. But TCC have for sure, IMO.

 

That said, I don't think Yuzu would work well with either of those extremes. He'd butt heads badly with a domineering coach. Some people joke about Yuzu and Eteri, but I'm 100% sure they'd be at each other's throats in 3 days. Or Yuzu would drive her so crazy she'd kick him out after 3 days. Similarly, with a coddling coach, he wouldn't feel challenged and would probably either go crazy doing whatever he wants, or simply decide he needs something else.

 

As for his personality, I think he has always been very strong and opinionated. Even saying, as a child, that he wants to win two Olympic Gold medals. His personality I think is generally more assertive than your regular Japanese person, although I think he makes up for it in politeness (or perhaps his parents have educated him such, to make sure his politeness counters his assertive personality). But that assertiveness is something many of his haters pick up on, too. I believe there's also quite a contrast between the way Yuzu speaks about wanting to win and what winning - and losing - means to him and the way other skaters speak. I think Yuzu's attitude is perfect and I also think it's essential to achieve this level of success and overcome all the obstacles he's overcome.

 

I also wonder now if this is one reason I'm not fully warmed up to Rika - and other Japanese skaters. Rika seems so meek in interviews, her voice is so soft and her words so polite and even when she loses she's smiling and projects an "oh, well, I'll just have to do better next time" attitude, but then she goes out there and her skating says something else and the gap confuses me lol I will always cheer for the Japanese skaters, but I admit it feels like something is missing when I can't feel that burning passion for victory - or for bettering oneself - that is so obvious in Yuzu everytime his skates touch the ice. Even in ice shows and exhibitions, you can feel his passion for doing the very best that he can, and I don't really get that as much from most of the other Japanese skaters. But that's perhaps because they're more typically Japanese and not so demonstrative with their feelings...

 

(and wow, this turned out rambly... sorry :headdesk:)

I think Rika's actually more strong willed and independently minded than she lets on. Her personal manner may appear meek, but from what I've heard she's very self directed in practices.

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13 時間前, Umebachiさんが言いました:

 

Also, sometimes people with asthma have more elastic skin - because during embryonic development the skin cells and internal lining of the lungs emerge from closely related stem cells.  When I had asthma as a child, a German doctor prescribed dry towel massage to strengthen and stimulate my outer skin - which, he said, will also strengthen the lining of my lungs.   At age 60, I am still blessed with soft elastic skin, but live in constant fear of another asthmatic attack...  

 

My son suffered from asthma when he was a child.  Once when I took him to the doctor for an asthma attack, the doctor said with a very serious face, "He should be careful not to marry a girl with asthma genes.  They would have children with asthma 100%.  But you know, girls with asthma genes are certainly pretty with fair skin."

 I didn't know how to react :O wondering whether it was the doctor's joke or not.  He did not show any smile to the end.  Really, I should have asked whether it was a joke, but could never guess his answer :happy0007:

 

 

 

   

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3 hours ago, KatjaThera said:

I agree that him going to TCC was probably the best decision of his life. Brian, Tracy and Ghislain and everyone else there are just perfect for Yuzu. Then again, I think they're perfect for a lot of skaters. They did so wonderfully with Javi, helping him reach potential that I'm not sure how many people saw was there, and I think you can see it with Jason and Evgenia as well, skating wise, but also attitude wise. TCC isn't just a training place, it's also a sort of home away from home for skaters, where they are treasured and nurtured and always pushed to become the best version of themselves they can be and encouraged to make their own decisions. I do sometimes wonder how Yuzu would have developed if he'd stayed in Sendai, but I'm not sure Ice Rink Sendai and Nanami-sensei had the resources to take him to the next level.

 

But I also agree that in general, coaches who are too domineering and uncaring of the skaters' personality are bad for the skater, while at the same time coaches who aren't strict enough and who coddle aren't good either. I often find myself thinking that Boyang and Misha and possibly Roman might need slightly stricter coaches. Admittedly, I don't know anything about their actual relationships with their coaches, but in the KnC, there's a slight feeling of them being coddles when things don't go right. I know a lot of people have issues with how Brian reacts when his skaters have bad skates - he received a lot of criticism for his "I don't know what to say" to Evgenia this season - but I prefer that. It's honest, it's matter of fact and afterwards it will probably become: "Ok, that obviously didn't work. Let's think about what we should do next." Which is infinitely better than a "Oh, you poor thing! Just rest for now and you'll see, everything will be alright!" sort of thing. Finding a balance between too strict and too coddling is probably the hard thing to do for coaches and I'm not entirely sure how many coaches have managed to find it. But TCC have for sure, IMO.

 

That said, I don't think Yuzu would work well with either of those extremes. He'd butt heads badly with a domineering coach. Some people joke about Yuzu and Eteri, but I'm 100% sure they'd be at each other's throats in 3 days. Or Yuzu would drive her so crazy she'd kick him out after 3 days. Similarly, with a coddling coach, he wouldn't feel challenged and would probably either go crazy doing whatever he wants, or simply decide he needs something else.

 

As for his personality, I think he has always been very strong and opinionated. Even saying, as a child, that he wants to win two Olympic Gold medals. His personality I think is generally more assertive than your regular Japanese person, although I think he makes up for it in politeness (or perhaps his parents have educated him such, to make sure his politeness counters his assertive personality). But that assertiveness is something many of his haters pick up on, too. I believe there's also quite a contrast between the way Yuzu speaks about wanting to win and what winning - and losing - means to him and the way other skaters speak. I think Yuzu's attitude is perfect and I also think it's essential to achieve this level of success and overcome all the obstacles he's overcome.

 

I also wonder now if this is one reason I'm not fully warmed up to Rika - and other Japanese skaters. Rika seems so meek in interviews, her voice is so soft and her words so polite and even when she loses she's smiling and projects an "oh, well, I'll just have to do better next time" attitude, but then she goes out there and her skating says something else and the gap confuses me lol I will always cheer for the Japanese skaters, but I admit it feels like something is missing when I can't feel that burning passion for victory - or for bettering oneself - that is so obvious in Yuzu everytime his skates touch the ice. Even in ice shows and exhibitions, you can feel his passion for doing the very best that he can, and I don't really get that as much from most of the other Japanese skaters. But that's perhaps because they're more typically Japanese and not so demonstrative with their feelings...

 

(and wow, this turned out rambly... sorry :headdesk:)

I think it's really the culture, if you grow up in a typically conservative Asian culture like me you'll get what I mean. It's not just Japan, but perhaps more so in Japan. Girls aren't supposed to be outspoken, girls should be quiet, meek and shy, girls shouldn't be too opinionated or "guys won't like you", girls should be subservient, girls shouldn't be too ambitious, "alpha" girls are lousy girls that no one wants etc. The mentality is everywhere, and you get subtly reminded of it often, whether you like it or not.

 

Granted not all of Japan thinks that way, but you cannot escape the subconscious moulding, and Yuzu is special in a way that his family allowed his personality to flourish instead of judging it like a conservative society would. Not being a girl helps too. There's a saying in Japan that “The nail that sticks out gets hammered down.”, and I think we underestimate the cost of being "different" in a conservative society. If Rika grew up in a more "open" environment, I'm sure she'll be more "outspoken" than she is now. 

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1 hour ago, Salior said:

If Rika grew up in a more "open" environment, I'm sure she'll be more outspoken than she is now. 

On the other hand, look at what she does on the ice. 3A, and training quads? Ambitious programs with great choreography and music that got better every time she did them? Does Rika really need to verbally express her determination to win? Her actions speak for themselves. Don't forget that doing something, as opposed to talking about doing something, is also a Japanese value. If she really were meek and mild, she probably wouldn't be skating at this level in the first place. 

 

 

 

 

 

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To me, Yuzuru and Rika are common in their decisive nature.  It's true that Japanese are not so outspoken, but it does not necessarily mean meek.

Honestly speaking, Japanese women are tougher than generally evaluated in the world :animated-smileys-hands-fingers-01:   Never underestimate :graucho:

 

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Oh, I know all of these. I guess Yuzu has just spoiled me, because he's always very open about how decisive he is, even putting it in words - without ever becoming arrogant. So I kind of expect someone with a similar attitude on the ice to have a similar attitude off the ice as well lol Hence, the gap I mentioned. For all that we sometimes joke about the gap between Yuzu whose glare could kill, before competitions and Yuzu the cutsey kitten rolling around on the ice, in all of his 'incarnations' Yuzu is very open and unapologetic about being very hungry to win - whether against rivals or himself. Maybe I actually appreciate that even more because it's not very in tune with Japanese culture - IMO, it's admirable, daring to be like that, although the hatred he all too often gets for it, is the price to pay, I guess - and that he's actually always been so. It's not like he's now a nation's beloved son, so he can get away with it. He's always been like this. Although I know it is unfair to expect others to be like this, too, especially ladies (given the way women are still expected to behave in Japanese culture).

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Look at his speed and flow into and out of the jump!!! If i can choose 1 point only to like about his jumps it must be the unmatched flow thru out ALL kinds of jumps. No one does it better :knc_yuzu2:

 

 

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9 hours ago, SitTwizzle said:

Yes, I am so grateful to Brian Orser and Tracy Wilson, who have always respected his personality, his needs. A domineering coach may have harmed him much. And a too complying one may not have brought him to the technical mastery he has now? Even with "a bit less" he would be wonderful (he was wonderful in R&J 1 and even before) yet it would be a loss.

 

I think there's a lot to be said about the Cricket Club coaches. They're excellent coaches and they get results from their athletes that their athletes are able to sustain. You can tell that they're respectful coaches who treat their athletes with compassion and a growth mindset. I used to have a swimming coach who would be cold and furious whenever I had a bad race and tell me about how bad it made him look as a coach for me to perform so badly and then give me the silent treatment until I did better. He was my coach at 13. I'm 30 now. I've never gotten over how terrible he could make me feel on a bad day - or even on a good day, if he so chose. I guarantee that TCC coaches never treat their athletes like that and that they not only know how to treat each individual athlete to bring out their best but that they actually do treat them that way. Yuzu is clearly his own biggest critic but he also just loves skating - I'm sure they know how to help him walk out after a rough training session where nothing came together feeling positive. Zhenya had some tough skates this year but it never once seemed like she was down and out over it - Brian knew exactly what to say to her in K&C. Jason had a horrible start to the season - car accident, scary falls - and there he was flying into that quad attempt at Nationals - they've been building his confidence in the right way for him. He's closer and closer to success (with the quad - he's already successful in general). Actually, so many of them had a rough start to the season but have come through now so you can tell that TCC coaches are always making sure their athletes are looking and working forwards rather than holding their bad events over them. That might work with 15-year-old girls and scary Russian coaches but they're not going to be 15 forever and it's easy to lose motivation when no one is helping you see that your worst moments can be steps towards something better. And then there's coaches who get their athletes to the standard of ' good enough', like Raf with Nathan and Eteri with Zagitova (like I doubt she worked on quads when the others started them even though Eteri knew she would need them to stay relevant in a couple of seasons). Will we ever see Nathan Chen truly reach his potential? Take Jason for example - he doesn't need that quad. He could stop trying for it. But he's going for it. He's pushing himself to be better and better and he has a coaching team who is working with him to get there when they could just keep him where he's at because it's 'enough'. It's a sport so skating at a level of 'good enough' for results is what a lot of coaches are going to aim for with individual athletes. It's sad because we will probably never see so many skaters reach their best simply because they're not working with coaches who will get them there. 

 

In short: Thank goodness for the Cricket Club coaches and thank goodness that's where Yuzuru is so he can be the best that he can be. 

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8 hours ago, Crow said:

Yuzu commenting over his SP
 

 Im happy I really wanted this video subbed :tumblr_inline_n18qr8XewT1qid2nw:

 

He truly is something special. Strategically, he's probably better off switching the 3A and combination but he has them where they are because it feels right to him with the music. He could also do other jumps for more points - he is certainly capable. But he makes choices that a right for him and for his feeling of the performance. He transcends this sport in a way no one else does. Anyone bitching about him repeating Chopin again is losing out because they just don't get what he has done here. 

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35 minutes ago, monchan said:

Look at his speed and flow into and out of the jump!!! If i can choose 1 point only to like about his jumps it must be the unmatched flow thru out ALL kinds of jumps. No one does it better :knc_yuzu2:

 

 

this quad lutz is really perfect. boyang's quad lutz is breathtaking too, as well as a bit more stable than Yuzu's, but when Yuzu hits his perfectly it's really the best in the field because of the outflow and landing position, imo

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26 minutes ago, memae said:

 

I think there's a lot to be said about the Cricket Club coaches. They're excellent coaches and they get results from their athletes that their athletes are able to sustain. You can tell that they're respectful coaches who treat their athletes with compassion and a growth mindset. I used to have a swimming coach who would be cold and furious whenever I had a bad race and tell me about how bad it made him look as a coach for me to perform so badly and then give me the silent treatment until I did better. He was my coach at 13. I'm 30 now. I've never gotten over how terrible he could make me feel on a bad day - or even on a good day, if he so chose. I guarantee that TCC coaches never treat their athletes like that and that they not only know how to treat each individual athlete to bring out their best but that they actually do treat them that way. Yuzu is clearly his own biggest critic but he also just loves skating - I'm sure they know how to help him walk out after a rough training session where nothing came together feeling positive. Zhenya had some tough skates this year but it never once seemed like she was down and out over it - Brian knew exactly what to say to her in K&C. Jason had a horrible start to the season - car accident, scary falls - and there he was flying into that quad attempt at Nationals - they've been building his confidence in the right way for him. He's closer and closer to success (with the quad - he's already successful in general). Actually, so many of them had a rough start to the season but have come through now so you can tell that TCC coaches are always making sure their athletes are looking and working forwards rather than holding their bad events over them. That might work with 15-year-old girls and scary Russian coaches but they're not going to be 15 forever and it's easy to lose motivation when no one is helping you see that your worst moments can be steps towards something better. And then there's coaches who get their athletes to the standard of ' good enough', like Raf with Nathan and Eteri with Zagitova (like I doubt she worked on quads when the others started them even though Eteri knew she would need them to stay relevant in a couple of seasons). Will we ever see Nathan Chen truly reach his potential? Take Jason for example - he doesn't need that quad. He could stop trying for it. But he's going for it. He's pushing himself to be better and better and he has a coaching team who is working with him to get there when they could just keep him where he's at because it's 'enough'. It's a sport so skating at a level of 'good enough' for results is what a lot of coaches are going to aim for with individual athletes. It's sad because we will probably never see so many skaters reach their best simply because they're not working with coaches who will get them there. 

 

In short: Thank goodness for the Cricket Club coaches and thank goodness that's where Yuzuru is so he can be the best that he can be. 

I think one of the things that contributes to the Cricket Club's positive attitude towards' skaters' individuality - and individual goals, because not everyone has to be an Olympic Champion - is the fact that they have many skating programs, and not just train elite skaters. There are beginners, there are adults, there are seniors, there are people who just skate for fun or people who started skating later in life and it's unrealistic to expect they would reach the same level as the elite skaters. All of these skaters are coached by the same team that oversees the elite skaters, and they are all given proper attention and treated equally. That I think helps the coaching team better realize and understand how people are different and they have different levels and different standards. But it's not like "oh, you'll never win a gold medal in international competition, why am I wasting my time on you?". TCC is not a club for elite skaters, it's a club where elite skaters also train and I think that makes a huge difference. I'm not sure how many of the other top coaches in FS also train at these other levels (or at least at so many of them).

 

I do sometimes think, though, that Yuzu and Javi have made TCC even better, as all the other skaters have learned from their camaraderie. I wonder if that existed to such an extent at TCC before them... Even if it had, they probably did take it to another level, and now we see Yuzu, Jason and Jun, who almost shared a podium together, being super friendly to each other. The Cricket Club Brothers saga continues, even if some of the characters have changed! (And those Cricket Club pictures at the Saitama Banquet were so incredibly precious!)

 

That's also why, whenever I end up liking a new skater, I find myself wishing they would move to TCC :1: I wouldn't mind if one day, TCC would oversee the coaching of all skaters... just imagine the quality of skating we'd get, too! (Although there are apparently skaters who aren't very compatible with the TCC attitude... I half wanted to buy Adam's book just because I was curious to see what - if anything - he had to say about TCC...)

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9小時前, Crow說:

Yuzu commenting over his SP
 

 Im happy I really wanted this video subbed :tumblr_inline_n18qr8XewT1qid2nw:

 

If Yuzu becomes a commentator in the future, there will be fans (including myself) watching all the competitions just to hear his comments. And we will hope that the commentator can talk more instead of staying quiet.

:peek:

 

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